Tooth and Claw
baggytrousers27:

thewhitejewel:

baggytrousers27:

physicalalex:

everydaygun:

no-mercy-in-this-dojo:

revengeofthemudbutt:

whiskey-weather:

No.

No.

because physics

respect but no fucking way

i think i broke my collarbone watching this

Definition of parkour is getting from one place to another in the fastest possible route.

Without breaking your legs/spine/skull.

Having your internals still in one piece by the end of it is an optional bonus.

baggytrousers27:

thewhitejewel:

baggytrousers27:

physicalalex:

everydaygun:

no-mercy-in-this-dojo:

revengeofthemudbutt:

whiskey-weather:

No.

No.

because physics

respect but no fucking way

i think i broke my collarbone watching this

Definition of parkour is getting from one place to another in the fastest possible route.

Without breaking your legs/spine/skull.

Having your internals still in one piece by the end of it is an optional bonus.

ursulavernon:

A friend requested I make this, and so here it is, and I offer it to anyone who needs it, with all the authority vested in me by whoever vests these things. Print it out if you need to.
The best art advice ever given to me—ever, ever—was “Don’t be afraid to make bad art.”
You will make a whole lot of crap in your time. Some will be truly awful and some will be merely mediocre. And that is totally normal and totally fine and for the love of little green apples, just keep going, because that’s the only way I know to get to the good stuff eventually.
(I normally feel horribly egotistical mentioning my awards, but I think this counts as using that power for good.)

ursulavernon:

A friend requested I make this, and so here it is, and I offer it to anyone who needs it, with all the authority vested in me by whoever vests these things. Print it out if you need to.

The best art advice ever given to me—ever, ever—was “Don’t be afraid to make bad art.”

You will make a whole lot of crap in your time. Some will be truly awful and some will be merely mediocre. And that is totally normal and totally fine and for the love of little green apples, just keep going, because that’s the only way I know to get to the good stuff eventually.

(I normally feel horribly egotistical mentioning my awards, but I think this counts as using that power for good.)

heysawbones:

I tell myself this pretty much every day.

heysawbones:

I tell myself this pretty much every day.

makanidotdot:

finally wrappin on this tf comic btw which means korra flood inc

look at this dumb bab lmao

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brightchimeradragon:

just-bx:

Just SCience

IT TOOK ME TWO TIMES TO UNDERSTAND WHAT WAS GOING ON, HOLY FUCKING SHIT MY SIDES.

brightchimeradragon:

just-bx:

Just SCience

IT TOOK ME TWO TIMES TO UNDERSTAND WHAT WAS GOING ON, HOLY FUCKING SHIT MY SIDES.

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Cats and Tumblr

coelasquid:

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

It’s funny because men’s cowboy boots and motorcycle boots both have relatively high heels (at least as high as the heels in those earlier art examples). I had an old teacher who was a little 5’2” bodybuilder that always wore cowboy boots and we would rib him that they were “acceptably masculine high heels” and that kind of thing. They seem to pass under the radar because they’re attached to such chest-poundingly masculine pastimes, they’re like the footwear version of “No homo”.

coelasquid:

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

It’s funny because men’s cowboy boots and motorcycle boots both have relatively high heels (at least as high as the heels in those earlier art examples). I had an old teacher who was a little 5’2” bodybuilder that always wore cowboy boots and we would rib him that they were “acceptably masculine high heels” and that kind of thing. They seem to pass under the radar because they’re attached to such chest-poundingly masculine pastimes, they’re like the footwear version of “No homo”.

Hetalia characters and the theirs great men

erobatto:

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Artiest: http://ctcsherry.tumblr.com

Reblogged not for Hetalia, but for the Civ V fanart.

busket:

dandycapp:

QUADRI CHE DIVENTANO TERRIFICANTI GIF ANIMATE
(10 pics)

(here’s the source video)

LADY BUG ROBIN

wolvensnothere:

So. Hey. It’s Lupercalia/Valentine’s Day/Emperor Norton Day/The Full Moon, so no matter what, I know what you’re up to tonight, right? Scrolling Tumblr in a Daze Crazy Sex Eating the Hearts of Your Enemies/Beloveds Whatever you damn well please!Well, before you get down to that, can you do something for me? Can you stare at this for a few minutes, and burn it indelibly into your mind, and then rebloop it, for me? I’d really appreciate it.Thanks :)Previously On Sigil Services: More Sigils

wolvensnothere:

So. Hey. It’s Lupercalia/Valentine’s Day/Emperor Norton Day/The Full Moon, so no matter what, I know what you’re up to tonight, right? Scrolling Tumblr in a Daze Crazy Sex Eating the Hearts of Your Enemies/Beloveds Whatever you damn well please!

Well, before you get down to that, can you do something for me? Can you stare at this for a few minutes, and burn it indelibly into your mind, and then rebloop it, for me? I’d really appreciate it.

Thanks :)

Previously On Sigil Services: More Sigils

A boy may be as disagreeable as he pleases, but when a girl refuses to crap sunshine on command, the world mutters darkly about her moods.

from Republic of Thieves, by Scott Lynch (via makingupachangingmind)

Somewhere, Kristin Stewart just smirked a little. 

(via other-bronte)

WNYC New Tech City - Ana and Mia: How Eating Disorders Evolved Online
286 playsDownload

explore-blog:

Such an unsettling, thoughtful, and important episode of WNYC’s New Tech City on how the social web changed eating disorders – a phenomenon that belongs with the 100 ideas that changed the web.

A striking factoid from the story – anorexia has the highest mortality rate of all mental disorders. 

wolvensnothere:

Get to Know Me meme: Favourite Characters [1/-] Alec Hardison (Leverage)

Bonus 15yo Hardison: 

Alec Hardison and Aldis Hodge 5ever.